PotW

The Photo of the Week

The Photo of the Week

Construction of the Pacific Railway and Navigation Line took six years (1905-1911) and included 13 tunnels and 60 bridges, 35 of which were more than 100 feet long. The original wood trestle bridges were replaced with steel like this one in the mid 1920s. During the flood, high water washed around this steel bridge and its concrete abutments threatening to leave it disconnected from the main line.

Photo of the Week

Photo of the Week

Cochran Pond. This was a pond used to hold logs that fed the C.H. Wheeler Lumber Company mill that stood on this spot from 1909-1932. Cochran is located at the summit of the Oregon Coast Range (elevation 1,833 feet), where the railroad line crossed over the top of the Coast Range from the Nehalem River watershed to the Salmonberry River watershed. During the 19-teens and 1920s, there was a full-fledged logging town here with railroad depot, a school, two pool halls, bunk houses, a big cookhouse and family houses. Cochran was named for brothers Joseph and J. Henry Cochran, lumbermen from Ashland, Wisconsin who began buying up large tracts of forest in this area in 1901. Railroad construction crews started in Tillamook and in Hillsboro in 1905-6 and worked toward the middle. They met just west of here in 1911.